Sales Hustle is now Sales Transformation
June 3, 2022

#322 S2 Episode 191 - PERSONAL BRAND DYNAMICS: The Essentials Of Building A Personal Brand In Sales And Business With Troy Barter

Today on Sales Transformation, Collin Mitchell talks with Troy Barter, VP of Sales for RentalMatics. Troy has recently been growing his online presence in social content and is really building a great personal brand. In this episode, Troy will be sharing his own story and how building a personal brand has become essential at work and in doing business.

Join Our Free Podcast Community HERE!

Want to solve a leaky sales funnel? Get Signup for your Free RevenueGrid trial HERE!

Want Your Reps Hitting Quota in 2022? Get Your Wingman Free Trial HERE!

HIGHLIGHTS

Troy's sales story
The skill of vetting opportunities
The long term disadvantage if door-to-door
The beauty of a personal brand
Relevance of your content

QUOTES

Troy: “It's all there at the same opportunity. It's all in how you view it. It's all in how you respect it and treat the opportunity for sure.”

Troy: “The best salesperson also does the best job of finding the best opportunity.”

Troy: “How viable is this long-term? Am I going to want to keep knocking on these doors for five years? Am I going to want to keep traveling I might like at this level where I'm staying in hotels for a week back and forth, you know, is there A better way where I can make the same amount.”

Troy: “We're not in pursuit of, you know, the perfect company, they don't exist. You're in pursuit of the bag, you know, as much as you can make for as long as you can make it. That's what sales is all about at the end of the day.”

Troy: “You don't need to build any kind of personal resume ahead of time. Just start just get going on it. You know, just sharing your experiences and little things that you're picking up on is huge.”

Connect with Troy and find out more about him in the links below:

Troy’s LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/troybarter/

Connect With Collin on LinkedIn

Want to Start, Grow or Monetize Your Podcast? Book a Free Strategy Call HERE!


Today on Sales Transformation, Collin Mitchell talks with Troy Barter, VP of Sales for RentalMatics. Troy has recently been growing his online presence in social content and is really building a great personal brand. In this episode, Troy will be sharing his own story and how building a personal brand has become essential at work and in doing business.

Join Our Free Podcast Community HERE!

Want to solve a leaky sales funnel? Get Signup for your Free RevenueGrid trial HERE! 

Want Your Reps Hitting Quota in 2022? Get Your Wingman Free Trial HERE!

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Troy's sales story
  • The skill of vetting opportunities
  • The long term disadvantage if door-to-door
  • The beauty of a personal brand
  • Relevance of your content

QUOTES

Troy: “It's all there at the same opportunity. It's all in how you view it. It's all in how you respect it and treat the opportunity for sure.”

Troy: “The best salesperson also does the best job of finding the best opportunity.”

Troy: “How viable is this long-term? Am I going to want to keep knocking on these doors for five years? Am I going to want to keep traveling I might like at this level where I'm staying in hotels for a week back and forth, you know, is there A better way where I can make the same amount.”

Troy: “We're not in pursuit of, you know, the perfect company, they don't exist. You're in pursuit of the bag, you know, as much as you can make for as long as you can make it. That's what sales is all about at the end of the day.”

Troy: “You don't need to build any kind of personal resume ahead of time. Just start just get going on it. You know, just sharing your experiences and little things that you're picking up on is huge.”

Connect with Troy and find out more about him in the links below:

Connect With Collin on LinkedIn 

Want to Start, Grow or Monetize Your Podcast? Book a Free Strategy Call HERE! 

Looking to start your own Podcats? Book a FREE strategy call. 🚀

Transcript

[00:00:00] In the world of sales, you either sink or swim or breakthrough to the next level. My name's Colin Mitchell. And this is sales transformation, a new kind of sales show designed to bring you through the epic life-changing moments of elite sellers. So you can experience your own sales transformation.

[00:00:29] Hey, before we start today's episode, I wanted to bring you in on the best kept secret in B2B sales. If you're serious about social selling and your only strategy is cold, the M's through LinkedIn. You're missing the mark big time. Learn how I fully manage revenue generating podcasts can change your life and your pipeline at Salescast.com.

[00:00:55] All right. Welcome to another episode of sales transformation. I'm very excited to have Troy barter on today. He's 16 plus years sales experience, nine plus years, uh, sales, uh, sales, SAS experience building a following on Tik TOK and LinkedIn by posting. No fluff videos on sales strategy and motivation.

[00:01:19] We've got some very good topics planned out today, and I'm excited to have Troy on been looking forward to this one. Troy, welcome to the show. Thanks for having me, man. Excited to be on. Yeah, you don't sound excited, man. You got to sound a little more fired. Paul, what have you too loud and drinks it? I don't hear kids yelling right now.

[00:01:40] No, I'm just messing with you. Um, I know that we're going to have some fun, man. We connected before and chatted a little bit. So, um, just give us your, your sales story. Um, you know, kind of the short version, and then let's get into sales, leadership and personal branding, which has been a, a big thing you've been focused on and I know sellers can benefit.

[00:02:00] Yeah. So I got into sales in a weird way. Um, I've, I've been, uh, in and out of, of being a rapper since I was probably about 11 or 12 years old and got into it pretty heavily when I was about 18, 19, and, um, started to battle eventually it was about a rapper on king of the dot grind time. I battle, I started selling beats online, long story short and real.

[00:02:23] Really managing a funnel. You know, I would go on sound, click, pull up the names of every rapper and their email and reach out to them. Then I would do time-based incentives. And it's like, man, I'm like, I kind of am good at this. I'm actually better at selling these than I am at making them. Sure. Yeah. Um, it'll lead to me just saying like, w let me get into sales.

[00:02:42] And I, I only knew of car sales at the time. Like, that was my assumption of like what sales was like. That was the only sales that I could even imagine. So I, um, put an application at the local Chevrolet. In Tampa, Florida. Um, I remember telling him, uh, as long as I can make three grand a month, this will be good.

[00:03:00] They're like, yeah, you think you can do that? Yeah, it shouldn't be a problem. And I got in, uh, did really well, really enjoyed the car business outside of the hours. Working 9:00 AM to 8:00 PM. Every Saturday, particularly in your twenties is pretty tough. It's actually not why I left though. I remember this.

[00:03:17] I'm doing a podcast with. With corporate bro and Ben gold actually left because my license was so bad. They couldn't keep me anymore. And I was, they were just like, dude, we can't have you driving the vehicles. We can't have you on our insurance. It's like, all right. So I got into what I thought was marketing was not marketing.

[00:03:35] They said it was marketing, it's direct marketing. So it was really a door to door sales company, a hundred percent commission. And yeah, they, they, they, they did. It's funny, like you get in there and it's. There's a whole bunch of people in suits. So the interview room, it's like six people, they all look sharp, like, like, all right, I made it, man.

[00:03:53] Glad I'm booked this interview. And then you get into the process of. It's a wild smoke and mirror show where everyone's dressed in suits, but they're making nothing. Um, it was door to door, uh, of reseller of a big brands like Verizon or Quill office supplies and stuff like that. And I was third in the country, um, uh, which was a hundreds and hundreds of reps and I made 20 grand that year.

[00:04:13] Um, cause you'd got paid nothing. Um, yeah, I got my car reboot. I got it. Um, cold showers for a long time. Uh, moved over to a better, I mean, to be the top and be struggling financially, like it's wild. I think tech sales, you don't get the perspective if you, if it's all you've been in that, like that's a lot of.

[00:04:36] Like a lot of sales is like that too much of it is like that people that want to get into sales and they don't know how to vet an opportunity, which, I mean, candidly, I'm still bad at vetting the opportunities, you know, like, but I I've gotten better over time. Um, it's part of the reason why I do what I do on Tik TOK and everything like that.

[00:04:52] Like people think that we're like selling them this fake dream of tech sales, like. One of the really good avenues, not the only one. It's the one that I know. Like that's kind of the big thing, but yeah, I, um, I kind of know, well, I think for a, for a lot of people, like sales is their plan B or C or D. Right.

[00:05:10] And they're just like, I dunno, man, I'm just happy to have a job, you know? And then it's, um, there's two there's, there's more than two, but there's two glaring versions of salespeople. Right? There's that like a. That's in there to stack a wild amount of bread, discipline treats it like it's their profession.

[00:05:29] Like they're a doctor or a lawyer even, you know, or a professional athlete, which is why ex pro athletes and college athletes do so well. And they view the opportunity that way. And they push themselves to be as great as they can. They're reaching to the highest bar they can get. And then there's the other ones that are like, I don't even want to do this.

[00:05:46] Like I'm standing on the bar. That's right above getting fired. And as long as I can just stay on this bar, I'm good. And even if I'm not good, there's a million other places where I can sell. Like I can just get in, they'll hire me and I'll barely eat out an existence. And, you know, that's kinda not so much the case in tech sales for the most part, but.

[00:06:06] In other sales band. I mean, anyone that's in other sales, that's hearing this as identifying, they know a million people that are like the person that I'm describing right now. Um, it's interesting. And it's all there at the same opportunity. It's all in how you view it. It's all in how you respect it and treat the opportunity for sure.

[00:06:23] And I mean, To kind of dig into like vetting the opportunity. Right? What are some things that people may be looking to get into sales are looking to get into tech sales or if they're listening and they're like, yeah, Hey, I'm that guy? I'm a top producer. And like my financial situation is still sucks. Uh, what do they do?

[00:06:42] How do they vet. Here's how top producers, where their situations suck can be really bad at vetting opportunities. Cause I I've, I've lived this. You've probably been a top producer doing a lot of small to medium business, um, high velocity deals. And you are used to talking the most, you know, you're probably hearing people say the best salespeople ask the most questions and you're like, dude, no, they're not.

[00:07:04] Cause I'm in here just like slamming deals down. Like I'm doing it. Non-stop I'm talking 75% of the time. Or more, and you're used to selling yourself and your product, and then you start to vet opportunities. And what do you do? Well, you do the exact same thing. You get excited that you've got someone to sell on the phone.

[00:07:22] Cause that's what you love to do. You like getting a deal and that's all that you like to do. You don't do a discovery for the most part. So then it's like, all right, let me close this one too. I'm going to sell them on me. And I'm going to land this and congratulations you did. But the opportunity was absolutely trash.

[00:07:37] You didn't do a discovery. No, one's taught you how to do one and you aren't even a wired to want to do one because you need to be rewired a bit to be able to make that kind of money. Because the stuff that got you this far is not going to take you an ounce further, not an inch further than where you're already at.

[00:07:54] And I think the big things, as far as like advice on how to view. Outside of culture is, do not get star struck by the OTE that they're offering, because the OTE is only one half of it. You can go at a place and they're like, Hey, we're offering our AEs $280,000 OTD. And you're like, oh my God, how many people are hitting target?

[00:08:14] Uh, we haven't even set the targets. But it's June. Yeah, I know we haven't said them yet though. Um, you know, or we're setting them, but no one's hitting them or one person is hitting them by the way, they're our favorite. And we give them all the inbounds, you know, there's a million different versions of that.

[00:08:30] So. OTE is important, but as important is how attainable is this target? You know, and don't, don't kid yourself of like, well, I'm the best salesperson I'm going to crush it. Anyways. The best salesperson also does the best job of finding the best opportunity. And if you can't do that, then you're, you know, okay.

[00:08:49] If you're the best basketball player of all time, but you're playing in my backyard. You're not just because no one will ever know, you know, your legacy dies with the last time you touched that ball. You know, it's the same company. Yeah. Yeah. And, and so, you know, in that example you gave, there is not that far fetched, right?

[00:09:08] So, and I think just, just kinda break it down a little bit, right. Is people that are top producers and companies that aren't making some real coin, um, typically are more transactional based reps and they have various. They haven't been trained in the sort of skills, uh, that you use in sort of tech sales, or even a lot of service-based businesses where you run a discovery and qualify the opportunity and things like that in a proper way where it's like your ICP is not just, whoever's willing to pull out their credit card and.

[00:09:40] Uh, they it's, they're sort of at a disadvantage, right? Because they get into the interview and they don't know how to run a discovery on the opportunity of this job. Um, and, and so this is super helpful for some people to think about how they could approach this differently and not end up in another situation.

[00:09:57] Just like the one that they're in right now, but at a different company. Yeah. And by no stretch, am I saying that you can't make money doing that SMB? You absolutely can. You know, there are people that make hundreds and hundreds of thousands dollars a year going door to door, selling alarms, solar. There's plenty of other options as well.

[00:10:18] And they crush it. Some of them only work in the summertime. You know, I've heard of the kids that are college kids, and then in the summertime they go out, they try. They sell, they're making six figures and then they're back to school, you know? So like it's doable. The reason why I veered off of that is I didn't do a bad job at it.

[00:10:35] I think I did a really good job at it. When I was working door to door is really well. How viable is this long? Am I going to want to keep knocking these doors and five? Am I going to want to keep traveling? Am I like, like at this level where I'm staying in hotels for a week back and forth, you know, is there a better way where I can make the same amount and there is no right or wrong answer?

[00:10:59] The reason why I push tech sales so much is because I've done it since 2013. So I know it, I don't get in the habit of trying to push something. Right. I don't know how to help people in it, you know, but it's by no means the only option and the number one option is whichever one leads to the. Like so, and it's different for everybody, for sure.

[00:11:18] You know, that's kinda what I try to tell people we're not in pursuit of, you know, the perfect company. They don't exist. You're in pursuit of the bag, you know, as much as you can make for as long as you can make it. That's the, that's what sales is all about at the end of the day. If someone says they're in sales to help their customer, like that is a fringe benefit that isn't benefit one, no one got into Salesforce.

[00:11:40] Yeah. Yeah. So tell me a little bit about, you know, how sellers, you know, you started to, when did you start to invest in your personal brand and start to create original content really heavily in, um, like my professional personal brand in February. Of this year and I'd done it once before I did a lot of blogging and stuff.

[00:12:01] When I was a battle rapper in like 20 10, 20 11. And, you know, I started to think of things and you know, you're, you're doing videos. So it's like your appearance, how you carry yourself, what you're doing, what you're saying, like had done that before. So I had a little bit of a slight, very slight leg up, but it hasn't been long that I've really invested in it in terms of video content.

[00:12:21] It was perfect. Um, okay. And so what do you tell people that are, I mean, cause you've had some pretty good success and not, not a very long period of time. Uh, w what, you know, tactical things do you have for people to get started that are either like, starting to think about starting their personal brand and invest into that, um, or maybe have started, but are maybe struggling a bit.

[00:12:45] So the beauty of a personal brand over everything else, if I can give you like the why of building a personal. Is it's your brand anywhere that you work, you're going to get paid a commission. If you're a manager, you might get an override or you might even get some equity, but the reality is you are building something for somebody else.

[00:13:03] And when you leave, you lose all of it that you built, you hit the reset button on the. And you're starting over again. And it is heartbreaking, particularly if you're someone that's in middle management, but at any level where it's like, man, I'm just doing something that's not mine. And I will have essentially nothing to show for it.

[00:13:23] Besides my paycheck. At the end of it. When you build your personal brand, you are not building it for the company that you work for. Not even at all, not in the slightest, you're building it for yourself because that carries everywhere else that you go, the ROI on that is higher than almost anything else that you can do because the larger than it gets.

[00:13:40] And it will always build if you stay consistent with it, the larger that gets the better opportunities that you're going to get. Now, again, I started in February were the very beginning of June. It's June 2nd. Right now, like the amount of opportunity that I've got just from all right. I'm just going to consistently.

[00:13:56] And it was trashed when I first started and it gets better as it goes, you know, like, but another thing, so I would say it's, it's yours. You own it. And you can do whatever you want with it. And the biggest regret that you'll have once you start is that you didn't start sooner. It's everyone's biggest regret is that they wished they had done it sooner.

[00:14:14] So do it now. And the other thing that people will say is what is it like imposter. Yeah. So like, I think the best salespeople upfront, um, that, that really hit kill it out the gate and the best content creators are a little delusional. They think they're better than they really are. They think they probably have more to say than they really have to say.

[00:14:31] And they think that it's going to resonate with people more than it might right away, but that's better than the alternate. I think there's a culture of like, well, you should be really humble. You know, it's really looked down upon you don't want to be that person for back in the day on American idol.

[00:14:46] That's like the joke person that thinks they can say, you know, like, and they're like, well, I don't really have much to offer. I just started as an SDR. You have everything to offer. You show people how bad you're failing and how you're figuring it out. That resonates more than me giving SDR advice. When the last time I was an SDR was 23.

[00:15:04] Yeah, who has the better advice you in 2020, or me plucking the shit from nine years ago? Like, it's so obvious. So like you, you, you don't need to build any kind of personal resume ahead of time. Just start, just, just get going on it, you know, just sharing your experiences and a little things that you're picking up on is huge.

[00:15:25] And you'll get better with time. You're going to suck when you start. But you're going to get better as you go, whether you're posting video or whether you're not, you know, I'd recommend doing the video side because I think it resonates better. It usually gets better engagement, but either way it's helpful.

[00:15:39] Yeah. I think there's a couple things that really stand out, uh, sort of chuckling when you're mentioning it is when you start, um, is going to be trash. Right? You said when you started you always trash and it'll get better over time. And that's the biggest, you know, we work with a lot of people, you know, that are.

[00:15:56] Just getting started with either podcasting or guesting on shows. And typically there's a lot of fears of they're going to suck. And rather than like, Lie to them and say, no, you're not going to suck. We tell them, yeah, you are going to suck, but you'll get better over time. And this is the same thing with creating content.

[00:16:13] You just have to embrace that, like know that you're going to suck and be okay with that. Don't let that be the thing that holds you back from not getting started. Um, and then I love that you mentioned as well as like, you know, it doesn't matter what title you have or how long. Sales or whatever the case is, like you have something to share.

[00:16:33] And, and what I found too through talking to people is, and even with my own experience is. I've you start to just set up goal, right? Like maybe posting every day is too much at first, but maybe you say I'm going to post three days a week or whatever the case has. Some starting off point. You start to have a level of awareness that you are going to, you're going to be doing.

[00:16:54] And so you start to look for opportunities or things to share, right? And so without like committing to that, there's so many things that are happening just in your regular day and your regular experiences in your, you know, fight landing, your SDR job, breaking into tech sales, getting your teeth kicked in on the phone, whatever it is, you start to look for those things to turn them into something creative that you could put out.

[00:17:18] Yep. Yeah, absolutely. Man. And I, the only other thing I would say is like building your brand. Yeah. It does help land deals for sure. People already know of you and everything like that. A lot of times fish will jump into the boat, but even beyond that, no, one's like working for GM for 60 years anymore.

[00:17:36] Like it's not happening. Like you're going to go to other jobs, you know, and now people hop jobs probably more than ever, you know, I just can't tell you how many VPs and C-level executives I've been in the room with or on zoom with, and we're talking about candidates for a high level role. And literally the first thing that comes up is the amount of followers they have.

[00:17:56] Like, oh, you won't believe that this person has a hundred thousand followers on LinkedIn. And it's like, all right, bye that's. And that was part of the reason that got me going. And I was like, so that's a real metric. Right. Cool. I can whip ass posting content. Like you're telling, you're telling me that that's going to level me up professionally.

[00:18:12] And the funny thing is the more that I do it, the more that I realize, I don't want to level up professionally. I don't want to play in their game at all. I like, I want to, I want to build my own game. Like, that's kind of like the realization over time and it's like, all right, it's not, if it's when like w when it's like, all right, no more of this, you know, I think I'm probably.

[00:18:36] Person at executing my own plan than I am at. Running someone else's for sure. Yeah. And so I'm curious to get your thoughts on this, right? Because something that gets talked about a lot is, um, when you're creating content, right? A lot of times people get caught in this trap of creating content. That's not even relevant to who they do business with.

[00:19:00] Like, if you don't creating sales content, if you don't sell to salespeople, uh, if you're not selling some B2B sales, SAS, In my opinion makes zero sense. Um, so what, what are your thoughts on that? Well, that's me right now. Kind of right. Cause like I, I worked for I'm VP of sales at rental Maddix, right?

[00:19:21] Rental Maddix is a car. They sold GPS tracking to car rental companies. Right. So all of my expertise in all of my content, which I have. Is kind of, self-serving like it's for salespeople, it's for people that want to do well in sales. And the real mission is like, I had a hard go of it, car sales door to door, you know, we just talked about it.

[00:19:42] You know, I, I struggled heavily, even though I was a top performer and it's like, I don't, I want to help other people by doing that. Is that helping me land? Any car rental companies? No. No. Is it possibly. Probably more than helping because sometimes I mess up and I curse more than I should then it's probably not helping things.

[00:20:02] Um, there's gotta be some other long-term goal or something else that you're doing. All right. Because if people look at my content and they're like, dude, like I want to do what you're doing. Don't do it. I've I've hit the lottery twice at two companies with my stock, one got bought by Verizon for $2.4 billion.

[00:20:22] The other one was Panda doc. It turned into a billion dollar company. I had equity in both of them. So I have the ability to say, well, if you know, I'm going to try to make sure that I stay within the grounds of everything, but I'm going to do me. I've had enough of the nine years of not doing me. And if that can't work, then I'll put all my chips in it.

[00:20:41] And you can't do that. If you're an STD. Not not yet. You have to be a little more careful with it in the way that you do things. And you should be thinking about that from a content perspective, you know? But the other thing is like, it's, it's a fine line between having it relevant to the people you're selling and, and accidentally posting stuff.

[00:20:59] That's absolute trash that no one's interested in, you know, I'm in medical sales man, I'm going to post the most exciting medical sales stuff. Or I'm going to talk about all these medical devices. It's going to have people leaping out of their chair. It's not going to have. You know, so you've got to figure out kind of that in-between for me, I, candidly, I just did.

[00:21:18] I just said, no, I'm I'm for salespeople. Like that's, that's what I'm doing. My content is to help salespeople. And it's really a digital resume that if anyone was looking at me, it's like, take a look and love it or hate it. That's what you're going to get. 'cause it's it's as real as I could possibly be.

[00:21:36] Um, it's not moving the needle in that respect, but I've seen other people that, you know, if you're, if you're working in SAS, a lot of times you're working with companies that are trying to get deals in it, or they're trying to get a return on their investment. So when you're providing something that's sales related, but it's, it's towards the needs that you're trying to sell.

[00:21:54] You can, you can work it where it's, it's helpful, you know? Um, And either way, just building up that following is never going to hurt just from a blaming a job perspective. Even if it's not going to help you social sell as much as you thought that. Yeah. Yeah. Um, I mean, so I guess in some cases, you know, it makes sense.

[00:22:13] Right. Cause I mean, you also have a consulting business, correct? Yup. Right. So it serves that purpose, but like, I guess in your case, right, with you, um, you know, being the vice president of sales at rental Maddix, I mean, like, I don't know, maybe there's just not so much. That's why there's not a lot of sexy content that you could post about particular things.

[00:22:35] Right? So, um, and you know, more companies, these days are cool with people having maybe something, uh, that they do on the side or a side hustle or something else in addition to, you know, their job. So in some cases, you know, there's definitely some exceptions, but, um, if you're an SDR and you're posting sales content, you don't sell into sales.

[00:22:55] It just makes no sense to me, but, um, I want to dig in a little bit into your, your thoughts and experiences, um, as a sales leader, right? So, um, you know, five times sales leader, three times in SAS, you hit the lotto twice. Like what's your secret sauce to leading teams to mega success? Man, I think the biggest thing that I've learned, um, and I've learned through failing at it for sure.

[00:23:20] Um, is. Really, I think it's a curse that top performers have when they get into a leadership role is like, they just want to impact that number. And, and a goal. One is impacting your people way before you should worry about impacting the number. And it sounds corny, but like legitimately you'll lose your team.

[00:23:42] If you don't do that. If you get in whether it's a brand new team or not, but especially if you're taking over a team and you see glaring things that levers that you could pull that would result in a windfall of extra closed one revenue, but you haven't built up your relationship with that team. Do not pull that lever that is beyond it's like the last thing you should do, but people, most leaders at the C level VPs of sales that are going to be your managers or even directors, they're going to not let go of somebody because they missed a quarter.

[00:24:18] But you'll get fired very quickly. If you lose your team, once you've lost your team, you will not get them back. I've never seen a manager lose a team and get them back. I've seen a manager lose a quarter and get it back. No problem. That is the most important thing. That is the foundation that you build everything else on it.

[00:24:37] And if you try to build that house before you build that foundation, you're not even building it on sand. Like you're building it on a cliff that is already got a mudslide on it and you're done. There's no way, like I. Impress that upon people enough that especially top performers, I get it. You let the numbers speak for themselves.

[00:24:56] The number here is not one that's quantifiable until you get your first survey and then it will be, so that's what you're actually playing towards when you first take over it to. Is that first survey and then you have to maintain it with the rest of them. So you need to make sure that your people are happy.

[00:25:11] They're excited to work. They trust you. They believe that you've made the investment in them, in learning the product that you've done, all of those things. So they respect to trust you. They want to work for you before you try to make any changes whatsoever don't even suggest anything. Don't even ask them about things professionally, until they haven't already built that up.

[00:25:30] You will have such an easier time as a leader. If you do that. Absolutely crushed target more consistently, if you do that, if you don't, you're out the door fast, I promise you that. Alright, so this is, this is, I love this topic. Um, let's talk about, let's say you're taking it. Let's go through, we're going to run through two different scenarios, right?

[00:25:53] You're taking over a team, you know, you, you, you're taking over a team that, that already exists and things are not working. Right. And. How do you build that foundation? Like you talked about or what are some things, what are some signs? How do you know if you're, if you lost your team, like there one foot out the door?

[00:26:16] Yeah. I mean, it's, it's pretty easy to tell, even all remotely, just on a zoom, you can see the look on their face. Salespeople are, do a really bad job of it. Excitement, like you'll know, you'll, you'll have a pretty good idea pretty quickly whether or not you're losing them in a way to make sure that you don't is making a pretty big investment from a one-on-one perspective.

[00:26:38] Um, you know, I'm a pretty strong public speaker. I would say it took years to be able to get strong at that. But I did learn how to kind of, you know, in person, not as well on zoom, when a room over and have people want to follow me a little bit on that first impression, um, that works, but it's. You have to back that up with a boatload of one-on-ones and actually investing in people.

[00:26:59] It's kind of a trick that, that doesn't last. It's not something that, that, that, that you can maintain over time. You got to invest in people like one-on-one actually get to know them, not about work, not about any of that. Just get to know the person, you know, get to know why they're there, get to know their history, get to know you should know every one of your peoples.

[00:27:22] Why did they take the job? What's the, what's the, what's the bigger goal for you? What are you looking for? Not just professionally, but like most people get into sales because it's an ends to a mean, well, what's, what's the main work. What are you looking for? You know, and it's doing that in a way where it's not like a.

[00:27:38] Very cold and sterile discovery call. You know, you're getting to know them and it's the same as a sales call, you should make sure that they talk more than you do. I do bad at that as well. Um, a, you know, it's my old SMB experience. I think that I'm finally learning to shake free, but they should be talking more, you know, and the reality is you should really care about them.

[00:27:58] And if you don't, you shouldn't be in a leadership. You need to go back to being an individual contributor. If you don't actually care to lead people and make them better, it's not for everyone. I have a wild newsflash individual contributors can make more, a lot of autonomy, you know, and they're not getting half of the headaches that you get as a leader.

[00:28:16] Trust me on that. So you've got to really. Legitimately or else it's not worth doing. Yeah, no, that's a great point because a lot of people, I think get into sales leadership for the wrong reasons. You know, they think this is the way to make more money. Yeah. Yeah. And I mean, in, in, in part ways that it can be because there's only so much you can make as one.

[00:28:36] Right. So like, okay. But if I'm managing a bunch of people yeah. In theory, you could make more, but at most places that's not the case. Usually the A-plus player on the sales side as an individual contributor is going to make more than a middle manager. Um, uh, you know, they, they might not make more than a VP and above, but they're probably going to make more than a lot of direct.

[00:28:55] Um, definitely a lot more than the team leads. Most team leads that I see a couple of their reps are making more than they are. You know, it's a real weird situation. So you better, you better care a lot about, about leadership, um, or else it's a, it's a weird road to travel. Yeah. So a couple of things is one, you know, really invest in your people, right.

[00:29:14] And just getting them all fired up in a zoom call. It's not going to cut it. Right. You got to back that up with some action and put the work in, you know, and really getting to know your people personally, professionally investing in them. Um, to make sure you have that solid foundation and then hitting those targets, uh, you know, becomes not so challenging.

[00:29:37] Um, and basically what you said earlier is like, it might mean missing a quarter, you know, to get your house in order before you can start leading the, you know, a successful team. So the big leadership one, man, and I just, I just posted about this is like don't, I think middle-management. I've definitely been guilty of it in the past, especially when people were putting a lot of pressure on me that wasn't even warranted.

[00:30:00] You start to manage worse and poorly and you start to do things that actually don't help move the needle. Longterm. You saying that you've got a new strategy, like is, is not the answer almost all of the time. The quiet. And if you're a manager, the question that you should be asking is, are my reps actually executing what the initial strategy is to the highest of their ability or to the highest ability of that strategy?

[00:30:27] And the answer is almost always no, because I noticed that with managers, you know, not, not to hate on the dude more than the, the world already has, but, uh, with John Gruden, you know, I'm, I'm in Tampa. So with the bucket, It always was man, we need like a new quarterback. Like it was like every year we had a new one over and over and over again.

[00:30:47] And it's like, all right, dude, like you can't make it happen with anything that you're given. And I think these middle managers tend to do the same thing where it's like, yeah, don't worry, man. I've got the new strategy that we're going to do that. You're just going to keep doing that over and over again.

[00:31:02] You're never going to, you're never going to actually Excel at them. Take the strategy that you already have. And focus on executing that to the highest level of your team's ability before ever considering ditching your strategy is if you keep thinking that just changing the strategy is going to solve the problem, you're never going to know which strategy was the right one to use because you've never got the most out of either one of them.

[00:31:24] So I think that's really huge. I know so many managers that do that, like their answer to every problem is changing strategy. You know, new technology that now we've got this new tool. Fix the problem, you know, and it really is the answer, honestly. I mean, I w I'm not gonna lie. Like I just bought two things for our tech stack.

[00:31:44] I got Mailshake and I got seamless for, for rental Maddix, and yeah, that's going to help quite a bit because I'm everything there on the SDR and the AEM, everything I am, you know, if you think that I'm going to sit there and cold call while I'm doing the 1500 other things, you know, I can only do so many of those on the day.

[00:31:58] I need something to help automate that for sure. Um, but it's not the. There is no tech stack edition that is going to solve all of your problems. There's no way, no, you got things to fix. Technology can help accelerate your results, you know, and increase your productivity. Um, but typically people want to buy the technology thinking is going to fix the problem, right.

[00:32:21] Or, or that's their new ideas, a new stress. Right. It's like how many strategies can you have before you run out of ideas? And it's like, didn't we already try that one before? Yeah, man. It's uh, it's wild. How creative they try to get. And eventually, yeah, it does turn into like, they just want something new and it's almost like, ah, blatantly obvious that you're you're, you're just switching to something that is blatantly going to be.

[00:32:45] Uh, and I mean, every time you pick a new strategy, you're basically just saying the last one you had. Wasn't listening. You just pick that one too. Yeah. So Troy, thanks so much for coming on, man. Really appreciate it. Any final thoughts? Where can people connect with you? Follow you all that good stuff. Um, I do have a final thought, man.

[00:33:08] We did one of these before. And I, wasn't happy about a couple of the things that I covered and I asked you if we could redo it. And I just really appreciate your willingness to do that. Um, it's a, you had to do twice the amount of work on this. You could be talking to somebody else and have another podcast done.

[00:33:27] Um, so I really appreciate that man, think it was incredibly professional and nice of you to do that. Um, and outside of that, man, I mean, I'm just a on Tik TOK. It's Choi. Barter's. LinkedIn, Troy barter. Um, Instagram, I think is Troy barter. I mean, it's not hard to find them too same, same guy, same beard on all of them.

[00:33:44] And, uh, yeah, if you guys, uh, if you're in sales and you have questions, DME, and I do my best to respond. If you have a specific question. Awesome. Thanks so much, man. We'll drop your, uh, social handles there in the show notes, make it easy for people to connect with you. If you enjoyed today's episode, please write us a review.

[00:34:03] It really does help us out. Share the show with your friends and as always we're listening for your feedback, you can go to sales, transformation.fm, drop your feedback there, and we will get back to. Hey, you stuck around that tells me you're serious about your own sales transformation. If you're tired of doing things the old way and want to get started in your journey with other people on the same path, head over to sales, cast.community, and crush your numbers on your leaderboard.

[00:34:30] Yeah. It's free sales cast, doc community. Send me a DM with your best pitch and mention this ad. And I might even give you free access to our best temples.