Sales Hustle is now Sales Transformation
May 16, 2022

#308 S2 Episode 177 - WE ARE THE CHAMPIONS! Nate Nasralla On Committed Champions In Sales Processes

Sell WITH your Buyers NOT TO them. This is the advocacy of Collin Mitchell’s latest guest, Nate Nasralla. Nate is the founder of Fluint.io, a company dedicated to helping you create a committed champion for every B2B deal in your pipeline.

Nate and Collin will be discussing why it is important to have a champion involved in the sales process and how it’s done. Tune in now and learn more in the latest episode of Sales Transformation!

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HIGHLIGHTS

Nate's sales story
Big challenges in sales
Internal meetings in the rep's absence
Creating problem statements
How to deal with re-circling follow-ups

QUOTES

Nate: “I kind of got into sales by creating building things. And I realized pretty quickly in my first startup experience that if I want to continue building products, you have to sell them and generate revenue because that's what keeps a company going.”

Nate: “It's not during a sales meeting, where the buying decisions are happening, it's during the internal meetings where the buyer or one person on the buying team, the champion is going back in there actually pitching our product in their own words.”


Nate: “I don't need to actually invest a lot of time and creativity into my follow-up. It's just the consistency or the volume of follow-up, that's going to get a reply, both of which are just totally off base.”


Connect with Nate and find out more about her business in the links below:

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/natenasralla/
Website: https://www.fluint.io/

Connect With Collin on LinkedIn

Want to Start, Grow or Monetize Your Podcast? Book a Free Strategy Call HERE!


Sell WITH your Buyers NOT TO them. This is the advocacy of Collin Mitchell’s latest guest, Nate Nasralla. Nate is the founder of Fluint.io, a company dedicated to helping you create a committed champion for every B2B deal in your pipeline.

Nate and Collin will be discussing why it is important to have a champion involved in the sales process and how it’s done. Tune in now and learn more in the latest episode of Sales Transformation!

 

Join Our Free Podcast Community HERE!

Want to solve a leaky sales funnel? Get Signup for your Free RevenueGrid trial HERE! 

Want Your Reps Hitting Quota in 2022? Get Your Wingman Free Trial HERE!

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Nate's sales story
  • Big challenges in sales
  • Internal meetings in the rep's absence
  • Creating problem statements
  • How to deal with re-circling follow-ups

QUOTES

Nate: “I kind of got into sales by creating building things. And I realized pretty quickly in my first startup experience that if I want to continue building products, you have to sell them and generate revenue because that's what keeps a company going.”

Nate: “It's not during a sales meeting, where the buying decisions are happening, it's during the internal meetings where the buyer or one person on the buying team, the champion is going back in there actually pitching our product in their own words.”

Nate: “One practice that I've gone deep into over my career that's been super helpful with this is creating problem statements. Usually, what I found going back to kind of this topic of, how do you create and then enable a champion to sell with you, they're competing against all this other stuff internally.”

Nate: “There are two kinds of parts in it that I think about the first is cost. And then the second is consequences.”

Nate: “I don't need to actually invest a lot of time and creativity into my follow-up. It's just the consistency or the volume of follow-up, that's going to get a reply, both of which are just totally off base.”

Connect with Nate and find out more about her business in the links below:

Connect With Collin on LinkedIn 

Want to Start, Grow or Monetize Your Podcast? Book a Free Strategy Call HERE!  

Looking to start your own Podcats? Book a FREE strategy call. 🚀

Transcript

[00:00:00] In the world of sales, you either sink or swim or breakthrough to the next level. My name's Colin Mitchell. And this is sales transformation, a new kind of sales show designed to bring you through the epic life-changing moments of elite sellers. So you can experience your own sales transformation.

[00:00:29] Hey, before we start today's episode, I wanted to bring you in on the best kept secret in B2B sales. If you're serious about social selling and your only strategy is cold. The through LinkedIn you're missing the mark big time. Learn how I fully manage revenue generating podcasts can change your life and your pipeline@saleschasm.com.

[00:00:56] All right. Welcome to another episode of sales transformation. I have got Nate Marsala on today. He is the founder over@fluent.io. Nate is also a three times sales leader and repeat startup founder. He's currently building fluid to help B2B sales teams stop losing deals when they're not in the room by creating a creating and selling with champions.

[00:01:20] Nate, welcome to the show. Thanks for having me con. Yeah. Uh, I'm, I'm looking forward. Been looking forward to having you on, I know you went on Christmas show. Uh, you've been fairly active in the, in the sales cast community and teed up some, some very interesting topics for us to talk about today. Yeah, man, I'm, uh, I'm excited to dig in and you've built a pretty incredible community.

[00:01:40] So thanks for letting me. Ah, yeah, no problem. We love people like yourself to get in there and get active. So, um, beef, just take us back here a little bit. Give us Nate's sales story. Yeah. So my, my sales story, I I'm a builder. And what I learned about myself lately is that like, Learning new things. Like that's what I crave is trying to figure out something new for the first time.

[00:02:03] And so I kind of got into sales by creating building things. And I realized pretty quickly in my first startup experience, like if I want to continue building products, you have to sell them and generate revenue because that's what keeps a company going. But in so many ways what I was doing by way of like user research, trying to figure out how to build products was at the end of the day.

[00:02:23] Sales. It's like figuring out what's a big problem that somebody is facing what matters to them and how can you help them get that like that at the end of the day is sales. And so when I started to discover there was this whole science and art behind sales that I could learn and kind of pick up along the way.

[00:02:39] I just, I fell in love with sales and, um, ever since it'd been, uh, not only building products, but building sales teams and selling myself. Um, so that's a. The quick backstory and kind of along that route and started noticing some problems myself, which is where fluent, uh, the inspiration for fluent came from this time.

[00:02:59] Okay. So when you started building sales teams, what were some of the challenges that you were seeing? So, one of the big challenges was that we would spend so much time coaching, training, ramping reps, all about how to message our product. And they got really good at it. But what we started to notice that.

[00:03:20] Man, it's not during a sales meeting where the buying decisions are happening. It's during the internal meetings where the buyer or one person on the buying team, the champion is going back and they're actually pitching our product in their own words. And we have no idea what they're saying. They're getting all kinds of objections, questions.

[00:03:37] You know, our AEs may be pro objection, handlers. But the question is like, when they're not around and there are questions or skepticism, that's coming up in the buying team. How do we help control that message? So we would lose deals when we wouldn't have a say in it. And like, you know, that's, that's tough.

[00:03:55] So that was one of the, um, I guess, consistent and recurring, uh, issues that just kill deals.

[00:04:05] And I mean, this is a problem that's been going on for a long time. Right. And, and, uh, Usually, I mean, how many people are typically involved in the buying process these days? So that, it's a good question because it's a, it's a good reframe to what I'll call like the complex sale. A lot of people, you know, over time, they're trying to do larger deals, move up market and so on.

[00:04:30] And the right thing to kind of ask is like how many people are in. Defining a complex sale, not just like the size of the contract. So for me, the biggest thing is anytime you're getting into three or more people, typically the people that are able to weigh in, sign off on a contract, aren't going to be in every.

[00:04:51] Which means there are other meetings happening when the sales rep isn't in the room. So three or more typically, that's where you get into this like complex sale territory. And again, I'm just kind of, um, I like the question and I'm jamming on this for a minute because a lot of people begin to think of like, oh, I need to be doing a six figure deal or something for it to be like a quote complex sale unnecessarily.

[00:05:11] But man, you just, whenever you start to sell is more complex than you think. Yeah. Yeah. A lot of cases. That's right. Cause I mean, there's so many different opinions flying around people with different sets of priorities. You know, they're measured on different things that all come into affect the outcome of the deal and a lot of stuff, you know, that that's all hidden from the sales reps view.

[00:05:33] And in a lot of cases, you know, in order to implement your solution, that means taking budget from something else, right. There was already allocated towards something else. So it's killing somebody, else's idea to roll out your idea. So imagine what those meetings look like. Oh yeah. I mean, it's, especially, let's say.

[00:05:52] You know, I, so let's, let's say we're in the CRS org and I am kind of VP of customer success who is thinking about, uh, net revenue retention. Like how do I upsell and expand account value? And then the head of sales comes in and says, Hey, you know, we, it's all about landing new logos. That's going to drive the largest revenue.

[00:06:10] And I'm competing for a small slice of the CRO is attention in budget. So a competitor, let's say I sell some type of like sales engagement system, and I'm trying to sell into the head of sales organization. That competitor may be something totally unrelated on the success side of the house. It's an alternative.

[00:06:28] Priority or an alternative project. So I love where you're going with this because it's a good, I think, wider framing of what competition in the sales process usually is. It's not like another vendor in your space, many times it's alternatives that come into play in an entire solution. Yeah. I mean, I think your people get caught up thinking, oh, I'm just competing against the other people in my space.

[00:06:51] And yes, that could be true, but you're also competing against. One them doing nothing like apps, like just status quo, right. Or you're competing against something else that is a priority that the budget will go towards. Um, so that's why to really be a strategic seller. You've got to think about, well, I need to know all of the priorities that relate to my product and don't because you're going to start to understand.

[00:07:19] Where you are in line with priority, uh, based on, you know, if they're trying to solve a much bigger problem, you're never going to win. Oh yeah. Yeah. I mean, one, one practice that I've gone deep into over my career, that's been super helpful with us is creating problems. Usually what I found going back to kind of this topic of how do you create, and then enable a champion to sell with you.

[00:07:41] They're competing against all this other stuff internally, and usually the most effective way to cut through all of that as like a really clear and good sharp problem statement, which is like, Hey, here, here is what is actively costing. Over what amount of time and the consequence or the, so what behind it?

[00:07:58] And most you'd be surprised, but like most even buyers in a deal haven't really thought very deeply about the right way to frame a problem when talking with their team internally. And so they're, they're not really using language that is grabbing and holding people's attention to get them involved in the.

[00:08:16] And so I I'm happy to go deeper if this is interesting, kind of like a formula for crafting problem statements, but typically I find like let's break it down. Okay, cool. So there are two kind of parts in it that I think about the first is cost. And then the second is consequences. So in thinking about costs, there's frequency re.

[00:08:36] And then pain. So for example, like if, um, so if you're in the marketing space like you, or let's do customer success, let's say, um, you know, you're selling Gainsight and you know, the problem is customers are at risk of churn. We don't really know who they are. You know, so you can say, okay, well, how many customers are up for renewal?

[00:08:56] Let's say there's like 5,000, um, annual renewal. It's the frequency. And right now kind of the severity of the problem is we're doing like 80% retention. We need to be doing 90%. So you can say, okay, you know, the difference there, that's roughly 500 customers. And let's say they're, you know, at a 10 K contract value.

[00:09:15] So you're up at, up against a potential cost of 5 million. So $5 million is at risk that your costs now the consequences, like, okay, so what, you know, what does this mean if it's not addressed by this time? Well, it might mean like, Hey, we're going out to raise some growth capital series B and the number one metric that investors are going to press it.

[00:09:35] It is lifetime value. Churn is a big contributor to that. So if we don't curb churn or increase our retention rate by let's call it like Q3, then we're just going to get hammered in an already tight market. You know, you go on LinkedIn right now. You're saying. Chatter and conversation about how capital markets are constricting.

[00:09:56] And so like the big consequences it's going to like grab attention first is like, Hey, we may not be able to raise capital on the back of some metrics that are looking a little, you know, not great. And so then ways looking kind of short right now. Exactly, exactly like that. That consequences way more significant than saying like, oh, our CSMs are spending too much time trying to match up data in different systems to identify account activity.

[00:10:24] Yeah, exactly. Yeah. So, so how do you, so, so what is the. What is the formula for what is a seller supposed to do to understand at a deeper level problems that they're trying to solve or formulating these problems, statements around things that have nothing to do with their products? Yeah. So. You can Le you can use some type of phrase in lead from insight from other customers.

[00:10:54] So for example, you know, often when I'm meeting with customer success teams, I find that, and then you could insert something like, um, the chief customer officer CRO is very interested for reasons like net revenue retention is typically like an organization wide goal. I'm curious to what extent your team is talking about this now?

[00:11:13] Or are there other things that you're hearing coming up, you know, maybe in your recurring team, That is a big priority for you right now. And so you can share some insight, maybe share some examples, see what they're kind of reflecting on, but the goal is to be able to basically write out if you were to listen into an all hands meeting.

[00:11:31] And so at the highest level you're hearing from leadership, like what those key priorities are, you should be able to write out exactly what the agenda is in that meeting. What are they talking about? And that's how you know that you've gone deep enough in discovery. Wide enough in discovery to try to figure out, okay, how do I connect my product to a problem or a priority that is big enough to actually be worth doing something about?

[00:11:56] And so let's say you do this, you do, you do a prop, you go wide in your discovery and you uncover the all hands agenda and you realize. You on the priority list are pretty low in comparison to these other things. Now what I mean, one, it could just be not the right timing or not the right fit for you. And if you can recognize that early, that's actually a great outcome, you know, it's helpful for you.

[00:12:26] It's helpful for the buyer. It's helpful for the account, but you should be able to at the same time, articulate. Hey, when this moves up the priority list, let me know. And I'd love to catch up and reconnect. So that's, that's one possible outcome. The second is that. You're not talking to the right person.

[00:12:43] They just don't know. And if you are, you have kind of like that spidey sense tingling. Let's say you're talking to an associate or a manager and you're like, but I, but I was just reading in the recent 10 K or earnings call or whatever it is. I was hearing that, you know, there's some other issues, priorities that are going on.

[00:13:02] It may be time to try to figure out who else you can engage in the conversation. To figure out, okay. Maybe I just need kind of a wider, different perspective in the organization or point number three. Um, you can help create and raise the level of that priority. So this is the last outcome, you know, if you are finding and you have a particular point of view or an insight from working with other customers to say, look, if you're not addressing this now, it's going to become a very big issue here.

[00:13:32] Here's the. Um, earlier this week I was meeting with, um, so yesterday I was meeting with the sales team at parametrics insurance, and they're this brand new type of insurance that helps teams in the event of some type of infrastructure outage. AWS goes down and you have all of these different issues, customer complaints and things like that.

[00:13:52] And nobody really thinks that that's a priority. They're like, oh, this isn't going to happen to me. But in their case, like it ha in, um, happened to Robin hood. They relied on some infrastructure that went down, tons of trades were missed millions of dollars of claims. And it's like, oh crap, that's a priority.

[00:14:08] And so what the parametric sales team is very good at doing is taking something that is not a priority and helping through their message. And crafting good problem statements. Raise that up internally when it didn't exist before. So those are kind of three potential scenarios. Th th the thing I love there in that example, specifically with the Robin hood, right.

[00:14:29] Pretty much, I would say most everybody knows who Robin hood is. Right. And so if you can use stories like that, right? Not some marketing speak case study, like, Hey, we took this company and made them 10 times more efficient and you know, drove this much, you know, 300% ROI. Like, not that, but like really.

[00:14:51] Crafting a story that connects with the buyer or your champion, uh, making them the hero, not you, the company. This is where a lot of people make a lot of mistakes where it's like, oh, we're so great. We have all these logos. We've done all these things for people pounding on their chest. But if you can do it in a way where you can make your solution come more of a priority by leveraging a story, making your customer, the hero in that story, then your solution starts to become like more of a priority in some of those situations.

[00:15:26] And sometimes it still might not be, but at least, you know, and I'd rather know early than later, because a lot of times your prospects don't want to hurt your feelings and they don't want to tell you, Hey, sorry, Nate. You know, these other things are way more important than what you're presenting to us right now.

[00:15:43] Oh yeah. I mean, that's a great point at the end there on like creating space for just real talk. The more you are finding your buyers, being totally candid with you, the Mo it's only going to be helpful for the deal, but on your point on like creating heroes, the most fun stories through my career have been seeing.

[00:16:03] The champions that I'm working with in a deal get promoted after the deal is done. And usually it's because they went through the hard work of figuring out how to craft internal narratives around certain problems that weren't being addressed. And people are like, oh my gosh, nice. Like, we do need to do something about it.

[00:16:20] You led the charge, you did it very effectively. You know, that needs to be elevated, um, and recognize in the organization. And so man, if, if, if you, as a seller are finding a track record of like internal promotions of the buyers that you're working with, like you're, you're doing something right. You're setting them up for stories of being the hero, like.

[00:16:44] Yeah, absolutely. Um, all right, so let's, let's kind of hone in onto this topic that I know you enjoy talking about. Right? How do you not get stuck in this? Just following up, checking in, you know, hamster wheel that so many sellers have experienced time and time again, even knowing that it's a bad place to be scratching your head.

[00:17:06] Wondering how the heck did I get here again? Yeah, well, so it's a very nice tie-in because oftentimes one of the first reasons is that like you didn't tap into or find a problem that's worthwhile, it's worth solving because it's big enough of a priority. Not only for the first person that you were talking with, but for them to get others involved.

[00:17:28] So oftentimes like if there's no update, a buyer can't move anything forward internally because they're not talking about something in a meaningful way. It's going to be very hard for them to come back. To you with any type of forward progress. So one like deep curious discovery to set up a problem of high priority.

[00:17:44] Like if you don't have that, um, you're just starting off in the hole, setting yourself up for some checking in emails that just don't get answered. But from there, I often find that a lot of sales reps. Are under the impression of one. Well, they must have forgot. Therefore, let me just quote, bump this up.

[00:18:02] They need one more reminder. Uh, so let, so let me just do that or to, I don't need to actually invest a lot of time and creativity into my followup. It's just the consistency or the. A follow-up, that's going to get a reply, both of which are just totally off base. So I'll kind of go into some thoughts on like how to replace that.

[00:18:23] But that's typically where it stems from. Like, that's the root of this whole, I'm getting ghosted, just checking in issue. Yeah. Yeah. And so, so what's, I mean, what's the alternative, right? I mean, you've got to you, you have to follow up, but how do you follow up in a meaningful way that grabs the attention and triggers a response?

[00:18:46] So there, so there's a couple of different, um, groups. So first let's go with just like a framework for writing a really good up email. Like what do you need to be thinking through like kind of a call it a mental checklist is you're writing an email. So first thing that I would ask myself is, am I introducing new information?

[00:19:03] Like, am I just kind of rehashing what I've already said or introducing a new, that's a big one. That's a big one. So many. That's the one where most people fail. Right? There's just like, there's no. Reason to be following up. Right. Well, and it's a big one too, because you want to like introduce this expectation or impression of like, every time I talk to Collin or every time I hear from him, I learned something.

[00:19:27] I learned something new. And so there's like this call it, delight this anticipation of, I can't wait to open Collin's email because I find that. New that's waiting for me. So that's the first one. The second one that I would think about is like, what is immediately on the to-do list or the priority list for this prospect.

[00:19:46] And if you like go back to this kind of exercise of like, trying to write out, like, if you were to write out their, to do list for today, Like, what would it say on there? And the issue is that oftentimes followup is all tied up in delivering value at like the point of purchase. So after you, you're a customer and you're paying for our product, then you're getting value, but there's always some type of way that you can help.

[00:20:08] Buy or get their job done today without a purchase. So how are you connecting your message back to something that they can do today? I'll make time for something that will help me with what I've already set out to do. Um, so address the immediate kind of is the basic idea which relates to like, how are you leaving them?

[00:20:26] Better off. And I'll give you an example of this. So the first company that I built was in the fundraising space for nonprofits, help them raise money, support their mission. And so we would, um, give them soft. To help them with that. One of the things that we did is made a better donation page experience.

[00:20:43] And so what I would do is I would make a $10 gift on their current donation process. I'd get the receipt, go through the experience and I'd forward it to them and say, Hey, I have a couple ideas for things that you could be doing right now to improve your conversion, get larger donation sizes. Here's like three ideas, happy to do a quick call and give you some extra thoughts.

[00:21:02] And people loved it. They were like, oh great. Like I could be. Generating more donations today. My job is to raise money. This is great. Yeah. Yeah. Very creative. And I mean, pulling on the, the emotional strings there with just making the donation, not other than that, not even that it has to be a lot, but also just taking the initiative to, you know, sort of look at, you know, what it, what the job that needs to be done is getting donations.

[00:21:28] Right. And what does the process look for? Look like for people making the donations and then tying that in to solving what you know is the most important thing to them. Yeah, right on. Um, and it's fun. Like it's actually fun to sell this way, you know? So I'll, um, I'll kind of switch gears and say, if you're now in a scenario where the deal isn't moving forward, because it's not the person that you were talking with that you need to follow up with, let's say you need to get a key employee, a VP, somebody else engaged in the deal.

[00:21:58] Then what you need to do is write a fordable email. So your follow-up has to be. Written to the contact, but written for somebody else. So if you were, let's go back to this, like, um, Gainsight chief customer officer type example. Yep. I may be writing to a CSM or customer success manager, but I'm framing my message around.

[00:22:18] Hey, I know you guys are preparing for a fundraise. Um, turn is up. Retention is down. We came up with some thoughts on what we can do. I imagine let's say Colin. You're the chief customer officer. I imagine Collin will have some thoughts and he wants to weigh in. I think he'd be up to weigh in on our draft.

[00:22:36] You share this in a way that the CSM just has to hit forward. Say, Hey, Colin, take a look and call. Knowing that he's on the hook for these metrics. They'll be like, well, if you're coming up with a plan for this, of course, you know, I want to make my opinion heard and weigh in. And so this is the idea of affordable email.

[00:22:53] You are writing with language that the end person is going to respond to and relate to not just the person in the two field of your email. Wow. I love that. I'll be honest. That's the first time I ever heard that. Um, and, and I think that. Such a valuable tip, right there is. Think about who the person you're writing to your champion, uh, think about who they need to share that email with and write it in, uh, in, in the way that the person they're going to need to forward it to or share it with is going to it's that it's going to resonate with them most right.

[00:23:32] Uh, because I think a lot of times people send these emails where it might have some important things, but then it's also stuff that's not necessarily going to be as relevant to the people they need to share with. So basically you're asking them to take that, rewrite it, send it. Um, and a lot of times it doesn't get done.

[00:23:48] Maybe they talk about maybe they intend on talking about it in the next meeting. Maybe they do, but they only remember bits and pieces of it. Like there's just so many things that could go wrong when you're not. Thinking about it that way. Exactly. And I mean, you just made a good point. If you're not doing this, then you are asking your buyer to do that work for you.

[00:24:07] And so it's about removing as much friction and where kind of this came from is so on the kind of founder side of the house, when you're going out to raise money, raise venture, you're trying to get introductions, warm introductions to different investors. So there's a practice of ghost writing the email that you want one investor to send to the other and say, Hey, you know, there's this guy named, he came up with this crazy idea.

[00:24:27] You should meet with him. If I want that introduction to actually be made and sent out, I have to do the writing. That's on me. Not the investor. Yeah. Yeah. I love it. I love it. All right. So, um, now. We've covered a lot. There's a ton here that people can, can learn from. Um, any final thoughts before we sorta wrap things up here?

[00:24:53] Yeah. What I would say is everybody likes the shortcuts, like the quick hack, right? In exactly the fast, fast, I just want to get on the ride and skip the line. And what I found is the amount of time and creativity that you invest into. Is directly proportional to the response rate, the more creativity, the higher, the response rate.

[00:25:16] And so like, I'll give you just like one more example of this one activity that I started doing for certain deals that, um, took a lot of time. Very high payoff was I would write a press release dated in the future, in their own brand, calling out some type of major headline that we could enable and that they really cared about.

[00:25:35] So back to this, let's keep going on the customer officer theme. It may be. You know, um, a hundred million dollars series B breaks record on the back of, you know, retention rate. And then I just kind of write out and, you know, have some fun with it. It'll take me an hour, but I'll draft it. I'll, I'll grab it.

[00:25:52] Um, I'll go to their media and press page on their website, grab an example, skin that brand, create it and send it to them and be like, yo, can you imagine a day like this? Let's talk about that. And it gets them fired up. Like they, you know, they don't see that every day, but it's something that they're marching toward.

[00:26:09] And again, I'm not promising that this is easy. I'm just promising that it's worth it. Yeah. Yeah. And, and I think that, um, it might take some practice, right? So when you, if you're not accustomed to working more on quality versus quantity, You know, with your prospect in your outbound efforts, uh, you're not going to be great at it at first and that's okay, but that's good.

[00:26:35] You need to lean into that. You need to, you know, do more of that type of work in order to improve the skill and don't get frustrated. Right. If you spend a bunch of time and it doesn't even get a response cause that's going to happen, right. Yeah. But more, more often than not, it will be worth it. Uh, but don't give up before you start to see some of those results and that I love the word that you used in there.

[00:27:03] Because it's not, it's not just a, I don't know, call it a practice or a tactic. It's a skill that you develop. And so you'll sharpen it over time. You'll find certain things that work, it becomes faster and faster, more effective over time. So I like it. It's it's skill-building and the more you do it, you'll start to have this sort of level of awareness.

[00:27:22] Will you be like, you'll look for those opportunities to. You know, craft those types of messages or outreach or ways to catch people's attention. So as you're, you know, sort of have this level of awareness of wanting to do more work like this, you'll start to look for those opportunities and find them that's right on.

[00:27:41] And you'll figure out how to match different types of follow-up activities to different buyers. You know, every everybody's a little different. Um, so if your followup all looks the same to very different people, great opportunity to step back and say, okay, how can I match something? For this account a little bit more personally.

[00:27:58] Yeah, absolutely. Nate, thanks so much for coming on. Really appreciate it. Uh, where can people connect with you find out more about what you're working on? Yeah. Well, if you want to connect with me personally, LinkedIn is the best place. Um, Natan Estrella, LinkedIn. And if you want to connect with the company that I'm building follow along with our, our progress, you can go to fluent F L U I N t.io.

[00:28:20] Um, so fluent.io is the company nameless Rolla. All right. We'll drop the links there in the show notes for everybody. If you enjoyed today's episode, please write us a review, share the show with your friends. It really does help us out. And then I'm also listening for your feedback. You can go to sales, transformation.fm, drop me a voice DM, and we will get back to you.

[00:28:40] Hey, you stuck around that tells me you're serious about your own sales transformation. If you're tired of doing things the old way and want to get started in your journey with other people on the same path. Head over to sales, cast.community and crush your numbers on your leaderboard. Yeah. It's free sales cast.community.

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