Sales Hustle is now Sales Transformation
May 13, 2022

#307 S2 Episode 176 - MIND YOUR MANNERS! Great Sales Rooted In Exceptional Manners With Samantha McKenna

Collin Mitchell will be having a lot to unpack today as he welcomes Samantha McKenna, a former VP of sales at LinkedIn and a 5-time sales record breaker, to talk about what really drives great sales. “Sam” as many people call her, is known for being an advocate for exceptional manners in every selling opportunity, will be sharing her story and how her sales philosophy applies to the industry. Watch out, tune in now to the latest episode of Sales Transformation!

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HIGHLIGHTS

Sam's sales story
Turning down sales for the first time
The struggle of fitting in and standing out
Taking care of your sales team
Courtesy and manners in sales communication

QUOTES

Samantha: “Number one, just make sure that your quotas are realistic. Number two, for reps, when you're thinking about your number, what I would advise you and how I've always been so consistently successful, is I figure out how to hit my number by myself.”

Samantha: “Help them make more money by making them more effective at their jobs.”

Samantha: “Just think about when you do your reach out, you know, are you just being human?”

Samantha: “Tell me specifically what you do. And let's see if I can find somebody who can buy from you or wants to take a meeting with you, even if it's not us.”

Samantha: “You got to build that resiliency some said at some point and we're not all getting out if you can't take the heat as they say.”


Connect with Samantha and find out more about her business in the links below:
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/samsalesli/
Website: samsalesconsulting.com

Connect With Collin on LinkedIn

Want to Start, Grow or Monetize Your Podcast? Book a Free Strategy Call HERE!


Collin Mitchell will be having a lot to unpack today as he welcomes Samantha McKenna, a former VP of sales at LinkedIn and a 5-time sales record breaker, to talk about what really drives great sales. “Sam” as many people call her, is known for being an advocate for exceptional manners in every selling opportunity, will be sharing her story and how her sales philosophy applies to the industry. Watch out, tune in now to the latest episode of Sales Transformation!

 

Join Our Free Podcast Community HERE!

Want to solve a leaky sales funnel? Get Signup for your Free RevenueGrid trial HERE! 

Want Your Reps Hitting Quota in 2022? Get Your Wingman Free Trial HERE!

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Sam's sales story
  • Turning down sales for the first time
  • The struggle of fitting in and standing out
  • Taking care of your sales team
  • Courtesy and manners in sales communication

QUOTES

Samantha: “What was interesting when I got in that role, which really changed the lens for me about sales, was it this is about helping people.”

Samantha: “You also have to have faith in yourself what you bring to the table and the person that you are.”

Samantha: “Number one, just make sure that your quotas are realistic. Number two, for reps, when you're thinking about your number, what I would advise you and how I've always been so consistently successful, is I figure out how to hit my number by myself.”

Samantha: “Help them make more money by making them more effective at their jobs.”

Samantha: “Just think about when you do your reach out, you know, are you just being human?”

Samantha: “Tell me specifically what you do. And let's see if I can find somebody who can buy from you or wants to take a meeting with you, even if it's not us.”

Samantha: “You got to build that resiliency some said at some point and we're not all getting out if you can't take the heat as they say.”

Connect with Samantha and find out more about her business in the links below:

Connect With Collin on LinkedIn 

Want to Start, Grow or Monetize Your Podcast? Book a Free Strategy Call HERE!  

Looking to start your own Podcats? Book a FREE strategy call. 🚀

Transcript

[00:00:00] In the world of sales, you either sink or swim or breakthrough to the next level. My name's Colin Mitchell. And this is sales transformation, a new kind of sales show designed to bring you through the epic life-changing moments of elite sellers. So you can experience your own sales transformation.

[00:00:29] Hey, before we start today's episode, I wanted to bring you in on the best kept secret in B2B sales. If you're serious about social selling and your only strategy is cold DMS through LinkedIn, you're missing the mark big time. Learn how I fully manage revenue generating podcasts can change your life and your pipeline@salescast.com.

[00:00:56] All right. Welcome to another episode of sales transformation. I'm very excited today to have Samantha McKenna on, uh, she's the CEO of Sam sales consulting and award-winning sales leader, brand ambassador for LinkedIn angel investor board member, and highly sought after speaker. She is broken knee. 15 sales records believes great sales are rooted in exceptional manners and consistently looks for op uh, opportunities to continue growing the company's efforts.

[00:01:29] Uh, McKinney, uh, summit Sam McKenna, Sam sales. Welcome to the show. How are you? Thanks for having me, Collin. I always blush when I hear that, that introduction, but, um, but thanks for the kind words. Yeah. It's, I mean, you've accomplished a lot in, uh, so, you know, I think that people need to know like, Hey, why the heck should I listen to Sam?

[00:01:48] And there's lots of reasons why they should hear what you have to say today. So take us back a little bit, just give us Sam's sales story. Um, and let's sort of take it from there. And then we've, um, planned out a very interesting topic for folks today, which I'm excited to get into. Yeah. I think something really interesting about my past is.

[00:02:08] I was actually through the 2008, um, fury of layoffs that had happened. So when our economy was kind of in a crisis, I got, I got laid off, which I thought was like the dirtiest thing ever. I was like, I can't tell anyone that this happened. Um, and, and I, one of the things that paid off here is during my various.

[00:02:26] At this company, um, I had built some executive relationships with the clients of ours. And one of that was the CEO of a company here in the DC area called hire strategy. It was a recruiting company. It was really, really successful. So I had reached out to that CEO who I had lunch with, uh, and said, you know, I just got laid off.

[00:02:43] So unfortunately we can't meet anymore. Of course they knew exactly what I was doing. And he was like, Rent a recruiting company come and have lunch. Anyway, we will find you a shop. And I was like, oh, okay. Um, and I fell into sales that way. That was the very first offer I got. Um, actually I got an offer to be recruiter first.

[00:02:57] And then I said, I don't think that's for me. Um, but then got an offer for sales and something that I found that was interesting. I turned down that job, which ended up being really pivotal. I ended up taking it and then I also turned down the job when I got offered my first job at LinkedIn. I turned that as well.

[00:03:13] Uh, so it's interesting, like two of the most pivotal roles that I've had in my career actually said no to maybe I shouldn't trust my gut that much. Um, the first time around, uh, and then I've been in sales now for about 15 years, uh, enterprise sales, my entire career, which, um, as everybody knows, is a whole different beast.

[00:03:32] Yeah. So I'm curious before you got into sales, what was the plan like? What were you, you know, what'd you go to school for? What were you working in at that time? Or what was the plan? Cause sales is always, typically people's fallback plan, you know, I will say it's like, I didn't even have a plan. Um, I went to Florida state for college.

[00:03:51] I changed my major five times. I thought I wanted to be a child psychologist and he got it and go that route. But the, you know, I had just, um, just started career a little bit in financial services. So helping military members figure out their finances, financial literacy, and then what I was abroad for a while.

[00:04:10] And I moved back to the states, moved to DC. I just didn't know what I wanted to do. I knew that I was really passionate about financial literacy, but I knew I was passionate about it from my perspective. Working, um, from a nonprofit angle, not from a profit for me, you know, and helping other people. So I just started to think about what did I want to do?

[00:04:27] And that was the first role that I got. I think I was a marketing coordinator and I literally lasted for like six months. My role is significantly changed during, uh, at that company. And I said, you know, I think we need a title change. I think I need a salary change. And then, um, HR booked a meeting with me at three o'clock on a Friday.

[00:04:47] And I was like, this is fabulous. I'm going to go into the weekend hearing about my raise, hearing about my title change. And they were like, no, we're making pots in here. One of them. And I was like, oh, okay. So there, there was no plan. And then. Just like you said, I, I fell into sales. That was the, not even the plan, but just what came came along for it.

[00:05:06] Um, and then you said that you two have your pivotal roles. You turned down the first time. Um, tell me a little bit more about that. What, you know, people have a hard time turning down a job, especially at me, some of the companies that you mentioned. So I'm just curious, what was the thinking behind. I bet that I had the same perspective of sat in a sales, which is it's dirty, grimy, sleazy.

[00:05:30] You're going to hustle people into buying things for your own financial benefit. You know, um, it felt like multilevel marketing to me. So I was like, Colin, please. Face product for me so that I can pay my mortgage. And I'm like, I'm really just robbing you to pay myself. And that's what sales felt like to me.

[00:05:47] And, you know, that's why I turned it down the first time, because I was like, I don't want to cold call. I don't want to push people into buying stuff. No thanks. And the, the company came back and they said, listen, you don't need to do any of that. Like, we want you to be an account manager for starters, you'll work with our existing clients.

[00:06:01] You'll support them, you'll help them. And I was like, Hmm. And I very wisely and aggressively negotiated for an extra $5,000 in salary, which I got. That I was, you know, the best negotiator on the planet back at that time. Um, but that was the first one to say no. And I think what was interesting when I got in that role, which, um, you know, really changed the lens for me about sales was that this is about helping.

[00:06:25] You know, our buyers are getting on the phone with us for their health because they have time because they're bored because we sent them a good message. They're getting on the phone with us because they have a challenge. They have an issue, they have pain points. They want to do something different.

[00:06:39] Right. That's why they're talking about. So I think that's the thing that I love about sales. The most, we get to do that. And then on the flip side, you know, I spent a career in sales. I spent about half my career as an IC. Then I moved to the executive ranks. Um, I finished, you know, being a VP of sales and when I got recruited away by LinkedIn and they said, you need to come work for us.

[00:06:58] You know, you're so passionate about the platform that company sales navigator. But I remember going for one of my interviews and I went to the, uh, the cafeteria, the LinkedIn office in San Francisco. And it was like the first day of high school at like a 5,000 person high school. It was teaming with people and I thought I'm never going to stand out here.

[00:07:19] No one's ever going to know my name. I'm never going to be able to get promoted. So many people here. And so I, I turned the offer down, um, during the holidays, in fact of 2018. Um, and it's interesting because after I turned down the job, um, I'll, I'll say John May hall, uh, was a elite, the leader I was interviewing with and he called and he said, you know why?

[00:07:41] And I told him, and he was like, I have a different perspective. He was like, come to me. You know, let's talk. Um, and then let's figure out how to get you here. And then, um, yeah, and then introduced me to my, my eventual boss, Matt Lupe. Who's now a GM of APAC for slack and got me, got me over.

[00:08:03] Wow. Okay. And so what was the experience there? I'm guessing it was very different than what you thought it was going to be initially turned out. I mean, when we thinks that, um, you also have to have faith in yourself of what you bring to the table and the person that you are. So status quo for me is, is never, it's not a thing that is.

[00:08:24] You know, coming in to do the job that I am paid to do and to do it well, isn't enough for me. And it never will be, um, you know, probably has the hence the record breaking. Um, but so I came in, I thought, okay, how can I make a difference? What does this organization need? Um, one of the first things that we built was a true enterprise team.

[00:08:42] So all we had enterprise and mid-market to get. We realized very quickly we needed to separate those out. So I built our enterprise team for the New York office. Um, and then the other thing was where, where else can I be of help? And I found one of the things was that while there are so many users of LinkedIn at LinkedIn, there wasn't a strong voice from LinkedIn on LinkedIn.

[00:09:02] So I had already built a Sam sales brand, you know, talking about sales tactics, talking about things that you can do as a leader. And I thought, well, this is an easy way that I can stand out. Then I started to say, you know, where else can we make impact? Um, how else can I help impact culture or peer-to-peer learning?

[00:09:18] Um, we started a great program called the three minute. Wow. 3m. Wow. I think is what we called it. Um, where we basically brought people sales reps from around the country from different business lines to say, here I closed an amazing. Here's how I did it. You know, we've all been on those calls where it's like, Sam, tell us about that deal in.

[00:09:37] Sam's like, oh my gosh, it was tough. And you know, procurement was terrible and this and that, but we finally got it. Everyone was like, you're amazing. And I'm like, what did you even do to close it though? How did it happen? How right. So we build programs like that. Um, so it was more just relying on. I knew that fitting in.

[00:09:55] Wasn't the key for me. It was, I knew that I was going to figure out a way to stand out and had I been a little bit more confident in myself that I do that. No matter what size organization I worked in, um, I probably would've said yes, the first time around.

[00:10:11] Yeah. So how can sales reps today take, you know, sort of that experience your experience there and stand out in their organization if they're in a big organization, or if they're trying to maybe they're on the path of the track to get into enterprise sales, what can they do to go above and beyond really stand out inside their own truly matters at the end of the day, other than hitting the quarter requirements to.

[00:10:35] Plain and simple. So whether you're a BDR and you're hitting, supposed to hit quota, whether you have a $750,000 quota, you know, as a mid-market rep or enterprise rep, all that matters first and foremost is that, that's what we pay you for. Right? That's what your salary is there for. That's why we pay you benefits it's to hit that number.

[00:10:51] So for anyone who's like, well, you know what, I'm at 80% of my quota, but what am I actually going to do instead is going to create a birthday club to make people feel bad. No, one's paying you to do that. That's lovely. And I've done that and I'm all for it. You know, I'm on squishy, touchy-feely as a guest.

[00:11:06] Um, but what really matters for us, you hate your quota. So for sales reps that want to get promoted and want to get to leadership, make sure you were doing that consistently. And in meaningful way of selling the products that your company cares about first. Right? Make sure you can do that in your sleep then let's think about how do you stand out and how you stand out is by tackling the things that you're leading.

[00:11:25] Or your leaders leaders are really focused on. So that might be, you know, um, how do we build a better culture that might be lack of attrition that might be, um, shorter ramp times for our new hires, uh, but find out what those things are. Talk to your boss, how are you measured? What can I do to stand out?

[00:11:40] What are you hearing? Um, that they want to see impact around how can you and I may, as the peer and Mia said that report and us leader do that together, right? If you start to have those conversations with your leadership, not only are you going to make your boss look really good, which is part of your job, but it's also going to make it really easy for them to talk about the great things you're doing.

[00:12:01] On top of what you're doing as a performer, but first make sure you can hit your number because again, no, one's going to promote an 83% birthday club verse starter. That's wise.

[00:12:16] Yeah. Okay. So let's, let's dig into that a little bit, because we all know from a leadership perspective, we've got to make sure that our, our, uh, expectations are realistic. Uh, probably the most frequent conversation we have with, with individuals. We were just talking to a company yesterday who, um, is not very well-known.

[00:12:38] Um, and they're BDRs are required to book six outbound meetings a week. Holy Stromboli, like this was not happening. And so I think it's always good to just level set and look at other organizations. You know what LinkedIn, for our SCRs, there was no 11 meeting requirement on a monthly basis. That's LinkedIn, everybody knows LinkedIn.

[00:12:56] Right? So number one, just make sure that your code is a realistic number two for reps. When you're thinking about your numbers. What I would advise you and how I've always been. So consistently successful is I figure out how to hit my number by myself. Um, so I look at that, let's say a million dollar quota on January 1st and say right out of the gate.

[00:13:15] And I'm thinking what's the math that I have to do in order to be able to close a million dollars. I also try to think about closing that million dollars by the 31st of October by Halloween. So then I have two months, right. To not put my feet up. Punch the gas of printing money like that. That's what I'm here to do, right.

[00:13:31] Is to make a ton of money. So work backwards, figure out how many calls do you have to make? How many social touches, how do you engage with people? How do you track job changes? What is it that you do to make sure that you can build that pipeline all by your. And then when your BDR spoke meetings for you, when inbound comes in, when a webinar that went off, the rafters gets you some lead icing, icing, icing on the cake.

[00:13:54] This is where I think we fail so often is that we rely on our marketers and our BDRs to get us to the meetings. Every time I hear a rep says that says marketing, isn't doing enough for me and neither are BDRs. And. They shouldn't do anything for you. Let's pretend that they don't exist. Just go chase that number yourself.

[00:14:10] The other thing I would say is, you know, for every person listening, that's like, you make it sound so easy. Do you know how hard it is to build pipeline? Yeah, I totally do. I built a business from scratch without marketing, without BDRs, without any of that. Right. Just relying on my own sales tactics. So for Sam sales, we've been around for 200.

[00:14:29] Years or so now we have 135 clients, 135 clients. And I'm, you know, for a long time I was a one-woman show. Um, in terms of our, our sales. And doing the business so it can be done. Just need to be smart. So think less about the tactics from the past. You know, don't make a hundred dials a day instead of think about really quality show me, you know, me emails, what we talk about all the time.

[00:14:53] Think about social selling. Think about connecting on the platform. Think about engaging with your buyers. Think about making sales navigator lists that actually help you. Right? That's that's the stuff that's going to really matter and make sure that you hit your number. You don't have to work all that hard to hit your pipeline goals.

[00:15:11] Uh, I absolutely love that so much. I think that so many reps are not thinking of it that way. They're not, they are relying too heavily on marketing and on their SDRs, our BDRs to build their pipeline. So you're saying pretend like that doesn't exist and do your own sales math of what is it going to take for me to hit quota by October?

[00:15:33] If I have to self source all of my deals and then anything else is icing on the cake, but. On the flip side too, from a sales leader, like are the quotas realistic, right? So let's assume that they are, then reps need to be more responsible for sourcing their own deals is what you're saying. Totally. We want to make sure right.

[00:15:56] As an organization that we are feeding our reps. So we want to make sure that that inbound demand gen is happening. We want to make sure that those BDRs are hitting their numbers. We candidly, you know, I, I would love. So much demand for our reps. It's quality that they never have to do anything from a pipeline sourcing perspective.

[00:16:13] Reps are really, really expensive. So if I'm paying a rep 130 or $150,000 base salary, which happens all day every day now, do I really want that person prospecting? No, I don't want them cold calling. I don't want them doing things like that, but what I want them doing is being smart about how they engage.

[00:16:28] I want them to be social sellers. I want them to send 10 emails a day. They have shown me, you know, me and show themselves in our company to be reputable, smart, not gross and aggressive and you know, cheesy, that's the kind of stuff that I want to focus on as a leader. But I think the other thing to think about is look how, so at your top performers.

[00:16:48] So we've been talking about this with a few of the organizations we work with, who we're like, how, how do we give our top performers more perks? You know, we can give them higher percentages for, um, you know, payouts. We can do things like that, but what else do we do? And one of the things that I think of is your, you know, five to 10% of your sales team, that when you look at them, They are phenomenal in front of clients, get them another BDR, get them a BDR that they split between two of them.

[00:17:17] Right. Have a BDR dedicated to that person. So they don't spend a minute of their day truly prospecting. But the only thing they're doing is being in front of. And chasing and advancing deals because when you have reps like that, that are exceptional, right? We want to make sure that division of labor is also right.

[00:17:35] And that the only thing that they're doing is spending their time in front of making a dent to our revenue. Instead of doing admin duties, get them NEA, get somebody to create their proposals for them, get somebody to upload things in Salesforce for them. So they never have to think of the perks of not just money, but how to help them make more money by making them more effective at their jobs, letting them stay in the lane that.

[00:17:58] Yeah. I, you know, as a rabbi, I killed it as a rep. And I think about the nights and the weekends that I would spend trying to do the things that are supposed to do for my company as well. Right. Creating those proposals, making sure that these decks were updated, making sure Salesforce was that data. If they had said you're just doing such a great job, we want to take this off of your shoulders to give you your nights and weekend.

[00:18:18] Which we probably think you're going to spend prospecting and chasing more clients anyway. I mean, what, what loyalty that would have bred for me. Yeah. Then you could actually, you know, do put the birthday club together.

[00:18:31] Thank God was still, I still did that. That happened to two in the morning. I never slept at all Holland. All right. So we said we were going to touch on a topic today and I think it's a good time to dig into this. Right. So what, what are some things that you're seeing. With reps today where, you know, they're not representing the company in the best way or coming off as rude or pushy or too salesy, or you name it.

[00:18:57] Um, let's dig into that one. Yeah. You, I think this reinforces what you're talked about, uh, with me and my introduction that my sales tactics are rooted in good manners. And so I just think about, you know, when we are engaging with our buyers, when we're prospecting, we're doing things like that. Are we showing ourselves to be human?

[00:19:17] Are we showing ourselves to be polished, sophisticated, intelligent, or. Are we showing ourselves to be gimmicky, you know? And I think there's a lot of gimmicks out there where we can send emails to people that say, uh, Hey, Sam looks like you just hired a VP of sales. Um, would you be opposed to talking to us about, you know, uh, increasing her onboarding time or increasing her, decreasing her ramp time using tactics like that, where it's just like, would you be opposed to, or like we help companies like yours, these three compare direct competitors to us.

[00:19:49] To me, there's nothing really, that helps me. And what I want to think about is like, what is the specific value that you drive? I also don't want to know that you're helping my competitors because honestly, then you're going to teach me what you're teaching them. And then I'm going to be using the same competitive strategies that they are.

[00:20:03] So that doesn't help me either. But just think about when, when you do your reach out, you know, are you interesting? Hey, Colin. I saw these things about you. I connect with them on you. I connect with you on them. I love these posts that you may have care. Some thoughts about that. However, the real reason for my outreach is I'd love to talk to you about Sam sales and how we can help your organization.

[00:20:23] Right? Honest, transparent, human. I think the other thing is just keep in mind that there are a lot of people who are going to do you two courtesies. There are the Sam McKenna's and the Kyle Coleman's of the world who are going to respond often to your really, really bad emails. And we're going to give you some pointers and we're going to say, Hey, some pencils said like this doesn't work for us.

[00:20:42] We don't need this. If I can offer you some, some unsolicited advice, here's where the email doesn't hit home. So I will say just real quick there, when we do that, um, be mindful of that. We're taking our time out of our day as sales leaders and experts to give you some advice. And so when you get that, just say, thanks.

[00:21:01] Be like, okay, no worries that this doesn't work for you. Thanks for the advice. I appreciate it because nobody really does that except for Kyle and I. And then the other thing to think about, I just had this the other day, somebody reached out. I said, Hey, can I give you some advice? And then she reached back out and said, thanks for the advice.

[00:21:16] Um, you know, here, here's my counter to that. Can you tell me where I went wrong? You know, et cetera. So I am now giving her free advice twice. And so I wrote her back, give her whole rhetoric and no response back. No, thank you. No, I appreciate the time. So just think about that for the rest of the world, for those very few people that respond and say thanks.

[00:21:37] But no, thanks. Just respond. Thank you for responding to my email. Thank you for giving me the no, I'm going to connect with you on LinkedIn so we can stay in touch in case this is helpful, but the amount of times that I write back and I just say, Hey, thanks, thanks. Anyway, this isn't a fit for us even to good emails.

[00:21:53] I don't get, I don't hear a word back. It immediately triggers me to think this person doesn't care truly about us. They don't care about the long game. They are selfishly just driven for their one thing. And that's it. And I, that that puts a bad taste in my mouth right away. It's um, I get a lot of messages, more so on LinkedIn, and I give people feedback as well.

[00:22:11] Um, I don't get as many emails for whatever reason. I don't know why, but I get tons of bad outreach on LinkedIn. Um, and I tend to give people feedback too. And some people do say, thank you. And you're like, Hey, they really appreciated it. And they actually are open to growing and changing and doing things differently.

[00:22:27] Um, because here's the thing that I think a lot of people aren't maybe. Is. Okay. So maybe somebody sends you an email, Sam and whatever it is that they do, you don't need at this point and it's not relevant, but how they handle that interaction, lack of response, or, you know, at some point, if it is relevant, They've basically ruined all of the rapport that they could have built with you.

[00:22:51] You know, we've all been there before writing bad messages. We don't, you know, not everybody writes great messages from day one in sales. So if somebody takes time to give you some feedback, you know, at least show that you appreciate it because at some point what you do. Maybe relevant to Sam or to somebody else in Sam's network.

[00:23:09] And depending on how you handle that interaction, it could be a referral. It could be a future relationship. I mean, you've basically ruined any chance of ever doing any business together, uh, by just being rude and ungrateful. Yeah. It's exactly right. And I think the interesting thing, especially when you're reaching out to someone like me, or you're reaching out to people who are in influential roles or consultants that have access to massive networks, you want to think about something one where you, anything that you need to connect with.

[00:23:40] It's basically available on the internet. Right? You can listen to hundreds of hours of my content, God forbid, but you knew a lot about me. Even if you spend two minutes on my profile, you can show me, you know, me, your buns off and probably guarantee yourself that I'll I'll respond. We very, very, very rarely get that.

[00:23:56] And if we do get it, it's like, Hey, I see you were feeling dead. Do you want to buy my stuff? And I'm like, no. Um, so there's that the other thing is. You're by emailing someone like me or by emailing an influential VP or something like that. You're not just asking for a product fit for me. You're asking for a product fit for anybody.

[00:24:13] I know 135 clients who have 35,000 followers on LinkedIn. Right. There's probably someone I know that could use your product. So. Take two minutes, show me, you know, me make an authentic connection, do some research. Tell me specifically what you do, not the 30,000 foot level. We help you, uh, you know, create demand at a close at 38% faster.

[00:24:34] I have no idea what you do. Video platforms, CRM, EA BDR. What are you? Tell me specifically what you do and let's see if I can't find somebody who can buy from you or wants to take a meeting with you, even if it's not. Yeah. Yeah. Great point. You know, I think good begets guts. So I'll do that. And I think that, I think what I see part of the problem is, is reps just take it.

[00:24:57] So damn personally, that like that I know I don't need what you are selling. Like it has nothing to do with you. It's just, it's me. It's not relevant. I don't need it. It's not, you know, that's all it is. And I think a lot of people just have a really hard time taking it personally. And more so if they did take some time personalizing it, but in most cases they don't.

[00:25:21] Um, but I think that's part of it or they still embarrassed when they get the feedback and it's like, well, wait until you, if you're not resilient about getting turned down for a product, wait till you see. Uh, and you get turned down that's stage that's the, the real, um, demoralizing part. You know what I would say though, like I also just think about, I would have killed as an individual contributor when I got my start, I would have killed for people like Kyle, like myself, like Amy Vola, Scott Leese, people who are out there giving you free advice, right?

[00:25:53] Like the, what an impact that would have made to me early in my sales career. So when you do get that feedback, when somebody like us does respond and say, let me just give you some pointers. Just reflect right. And say, do they have a point? Can I adjust? Like, I'm, I'm so eager to learn how to do my game better.

[00:26:10] Even at the stage of my career, there's so much I can improve on. I'm just, I'm waiting and dying for somebody to give me some feedback. Yeah. Yeah. And if you're not, if you're not, if you can't get on board with getting. Turned down and hearing no. And receiving feedback sales is probably not for you and you may reconsider something else.

[00:26:29] You got to build our resiliency some, so at some point, or know, or get out if you can't take the heat, as they say. Yeah. Yeah. Well, Sam, thank you so much for coming on today. Really appreciated learning a little bit more about you and, um, diving into this topic for sellers. I think there's a lot to learn for them.

[00:26:45] Any final thoughts and where's the best place for people to get into the world of Sam sales? Yeah, thanks for having me. You guys, please feel free to say hello on LinkedIn. Of course, Sam sales consulting.com is where you can find so many resources, but we have a really great newsletter that goes out every Friday.

[00:27:01] I'm pretty funny if I do say so myself, so come sign up and join us there. And then if you can't get enough, uh, just pop over to shorts that Sam sales consulting.com and we've got tons of video subscriptions to teach you everything. That's in my head again, God forbid, but hopefully that'll help you with.

[00:27:16] Yeah. Or feel free to send you a shitty email and wait for some feedback

[00:27:23] that I won't respond to it. Bring it, bring on the show. Me, you know, Novi. I promise to respond to those. Yeah. All right. Well, thanks so much everybody. If you enjoyed the episode, please write us a review, share the show with your friends, and we're always listening for your feedback. You can go to sales, transformation.fm, drop us a voice DM, and we will get back to you.

[00:27:41] Hey, you stopped. That tells me you're serious about your own sales transformation. If you're tired of doing things the old way and want to get started in your journey with other people on the same path, head over to sales, cast.community, and crush your numbers on your leaderboard. Yeah. It's free sales cast.community.

[00:27:58] Send me a DM with your best pitch and mention this ad. And I might even give you free access to our best templates.